GEOfood

Cliffs of Fundy is home to many regional foods and traditional harvesting methods with strong and unique links to geology and landscape. Nearly all of these foods were enjoyed by, and their harvesting methods learnt from, the indigenous Mi’kmaq peoples, who shared their knowledge with later settlers. The unique traditional culinary experiences of Cliffs of Fundy are dependent on the
seasons. These regional foods can be purchased in restaurants, giftshops, markets, and directly from local producers throughout the Geopark.

  • Wild blueberries grow on acidic glacial kame fields, the largest wild blueberry harvest worldwide. Wild blueberries are harvested in late August and celebrated at the Nova Scotia Wild Blueberry Festival.
  • Traditional weir fishing uses the natural tidal cycle of the Bay of Fundy and draws on Mi’kmaw teachings. The fishery is a sustainable fishery with virtually no by-catch of endangered species.
  • World-renowned clams thrive in the intertidal muds. Visit the seafood take-outs along the shore for an order of local fried clams.
  • Dulse is an endemic food of dried seaweed that grows naturally in the bay. Picked by hand at low tide, locally-harvested dulse varies in taste based on the location at which it was picked.
  • Maple syrup production involves tapping the native sugar maples that favour the highlands. Maple farms open to visitors in the Spring, when the sap begins to flow.

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Fantastic morning at Partridge Island with the Canadian Chamber Choir ! ... See MoreSee Less
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Today is the last day of official Mi’kmaw Heritage Month but every month is Mi’kmaw heritage in Cliffs of Fundy Geopark. On the left of the poster is a traditional Mi’kmaw motif of the two curves - this is what inspires our Geopark logo. ... See MoreSee Less
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Come out to Colchester-East Hants Public Library next Wednesday to check out this awesome talk!"The Amazing Geological History of Nova Scotia: the Story Beneath the Scenery" with Dr. Sandra Barr Join us for a discussion with Dr. Sandra Barr, a professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Acadia University, as she talks about the fascinating and unique history that lies beneath our feet and on our rocky shores. The rocks and fossils around us tell a fascinating story of the origin and evolution of our Maritime Provinces. 🗓️ Wednesday, November 2⏱️ 6:30pm-7:30pm📍 Truro Library ... See MoreSee Less
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Awesome work Ship's Company Theatre Society !!It's Small Business Week, and on behalf of the Cumberland Business Connector, The CBDC, and the Cumberland Chamber of Commerce (aka the Amherst & Area Chamber of Commerce), Thank you Ship's Company Theatre for bringing such wonderful, joy to so many in Cumberland County. Keep on rocking the stage in Parrsboro! ... See MoreSee Less
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October 6th is #GeodiversityDay !! International Geodiversity Day is a worldwide celebration to promote the many aspects of Geodiversity around the world! What is Geodiversity? It is everything around you that isn't living! The rocks, minerals, fossils, and landscapes that make up the world around you! For Geodiversity Day 2022, Cliffs of Fundy Geopark teamed up with Stonehammer UNESCO Global Geopark and Géoparc mondial UNESCO de Percé to highlight some of the incredible Geodiversity in Atlantic Canada! Follow Geoscientists from three Canadian Geoparks for a walk through time! 🌎🌍🌏A huge thanks to Catrina at Stonehammer for editting this video together in time and to Max at Percé for initiating this collaboration! For more information about Geodiveristy Day, check out www.geodiversityday.org/ ... See MoreSee Less
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What is a Geopark?

A Geopark is a designation that attracts tourists wishing to explore the connections between geology, local communities, culture, and nature. Geoparks are designed to promote tourism and celebrate a region’s uniqueness, and do not prohibit any land use.