Ecology

The Upper Bay including the Minas Basin and Cobequid Bay in the Bay of Fundy host one of the largest shorebird migrations in North America. Every year, in the late summer/early fall, thousands of birds flock to the mudflats of the Bay of Fundy. The record-high daily tides uncover an important food source for these birds on their way to South America. Shrimp and krill are uncovered as the Fundy tides go out, ensuring safe and plentiful feasting for these weary travellers. The estuaries and saltmarshes, along with other coastal wetlands of the upper bay provide safe and important roosting areas for the various species including semipalmated sandpipers and plovers. Some of the areas in the Cliffs of Fundy Geopark are: The Fundy Discovery site on Salmon River, Little Dyke, and Thomas Cove Coastal Reserve. Since the 1970s, when research into this phenomenon began, migratory bird populations have been reduced by half and are steadily declining. It is an event which is recognized by the Nature Conservancy of Canada, and education around the issue hopes to bring awareness to more sustainable human activities during these migratory times. The Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network has designated the Cobequid Bay as a Landscape of Hemispheric Importance.

Mud Piddock are an endangered species, who’s fragile habitat is found among the red mudstone in the upper Bay of Fundy. These clams, also known as “Fallen Angel Wings” are a crucial part of the ecosystem, supporting shorebird populations and other coastal creatures. They live exclusively in the mudstone in the Economy, Five Islands and Burntcoat Head areas of the Cobequid Bay. Human activities have previously overlooked these habitats and efforts are being made to educate locals and visitors about safe practices in these areas.

Various lichens, mushrooms, and wildflowers populate the Acadian forest system that makes up the Cliffs of Fundy Geopark. Important protected areas including Economy Wilderness Area and Portapique Wilderness Area help establish the northern boundary of the Geopark. MacElmon’s Pond is another Wildlife reserve which provides safe nesting for Bald Eagles and Hawks in the area.

The Cliffs of Fundy Geopark ecology varies because the environments here include; coastal areas, estuaries, brackish (where salt water and fresh water meet, such as a river meeting the bay) waters, natural forests, lakes, and farmland. The area is well known for it’s blueberries, honey, and maple agriculture.

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The Amazing Astronomy event at the Advocate Library is tomorrow night (Thursday, May 23, 2024) at 10pm! ... See MoreSee Less
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Here's more information on the research being conducteDalhousie Universityrsity on the Inner Bay of Fundy Atlantic salmon. Very interesting! ... See MoreSee Less
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Cliffs of Fundy Geopark (Society) Networking Event & AGM (June 17, 2024)All are invited to attend a Networking Event and Annual General Meeting for the Cliffs of Fundy Geopark Society on Monday, June 17, 2024, starting at 7pm at the Economy Recreation Centre. Learn about the Geopark and what’s new, network and exchange brochures with area tourism businesses and organizations, and most importantly, renew your membership or become a member to participate in the Annual General Meeting.Tourism Businesses and Organizations are invited to set up a display to promote themselves and exchange brochures (set up between 6:30pm-7pm). The networking event will begin at 7pm with light refreshments and the Annual General Meeting will take place at 7:30pm.Annual membership fees for the Society are $10 for individuals, $15 for a family, and $20 for businesses/organizations. All proceeds support the Society and its work in promoting the Cliffs of Fundy UNESCO Global Geopark, which spans the Fundy shore from Lower Truro to Apple River. UNESCO Global Geoparks are landscapes of international geological significance that are managed with a holistic concept of protection, education, and sustainable development. At present, there are 213 UNESCO Global Geoparks in 48 countries. Cliffs of Fundy is one of just five in Canada. The Geopark and UNESCO designation puts our region on the international stage and validates something we have always known – we live in a very special part of the world!See you on the June 17th! If you have questions email manager@fundygeopark.ca or call 902-641-2225. ... See MoreSee Less
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Cliffs of Fundy is a proud to be a member of the Global Geoparks Network and among some of the most extraordinary places from around the world! Check out the stunning landscapes in this video, learn more about the GGN, and pay extra close attention at the 1:58 minute mark : ) ... See MoreSee Less
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Now here's a great event coming up in the Geopark on Thursday, May 23rd at 10pm offered by the Advocate LibrCumberland Public Librariesaries)!Through generous financial contributions from the Public Health Agency of Canada, we are able to offer our Amazing Astronomy program! Come watch the stars with your community and learn about astronomy. Snacks and planetarium presentations provided.Date: Thursday, May 23rdTime: 10pmLocation: Advocate Library (93 Mills Road)Call 902-392-2214 to register!*Please note: This program is weather dependent. Our rain date will be Thursday, May 30 at 10pm.* ... See MoreSee Less
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What is a Geopark?

A Geopark is a designation that attracts tourists wishing to explore the connections between geology, local communities, culture, and nature. Geoparks are designed to promote tourism and celebrate a region’s uniqueness, and do not prohibit any land use.