Cape d’Or

Cape d’Or and its lighthouse watch over the ‘Dory Rips’– powerful tidal currents. They also stand on towering basalt cliffs in which historic native copper mines can still be seen. Known to the Mi’kmaq for millenia, the copper deposits were ‘rediscovered’ by Samuel de Champlain in the early 1600s, and mined in a ‘boom’ period from 1900-1907.

Geological Formation: North Mountain Formation
Age: Late Triassic-Early Jurassic (circa 200 million years)
Directions: Take Highway 209 east of Advocate to Back Street. In about 0.5 km, turn onto Cape D’Or Road and go south 5.6 km to Cape d’Or lighthouse. Park at top where there is a viewing platform. If you choose, follow the steeply descending track to the lighthouse but stay back from the cliff edge at the bottom.
GPS Coordinates: 45.290726, -64.774116
Tide Times: http://www.tides.gc.ca/eng/station?sid=236


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If you're curious as to why Cliffs of Fundy boasts the highest tides on the planet, check out this explanation from NASA. The stunning image was captured by NASA's Aqua Earth-Science Satellite Mission.

earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/145784/massive-muddy-tides-in-the-bay-of-fundy?src=ve
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1 month ago

Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Global Geopark

Mark your calendars! The date for the 2020 Not Since Moses Race has been released. This locally-run event attracts people from all over the world to race the world's highest tides against a backdrop of stunning cliffs and shoreline. ... See MoreSee Less

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Tomorrow Monday, September 30 is Orange Shirt Day, an annual event to recognize the experience of residential schools.

Individuals and communities across Canada continue to suffer the intergenerational effects of the violence from residential schools. “Orange Shirt Day began in 2013 as a result of residential school survivor Phyllis Jack Webstad discussing her experience when she arrived at a residential school. On her first day at residential school Phyllis had her new orange shirt taken away from her. Phyllis' experience is used today to teach students about residential schools and their assimilation practices.”

The date of September 30 was chosen for the annual event because it is the time of year in which Indigenous children were historically taken from their homes to residential schools. In addition to simply wearing an orange shirt on September 30, this annual event encourages Canadians to learn about the history of residential schools.
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2 months ago

Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Global Geopark

More inspiration from Nikos Zouros, President of the Global Geoparks Network and Cliffs of Fundy evaluator ... See MoreSee Less

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This poster says it all: Geoparks are all about connecting people with the Earth (the geological map of Europe as backdrop ...) Making new partnerships for Cliffs of Fundy at the 15th European Geoparks Conference ... See MoreSee Less

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What is a Geopark?

A Geopark is a designation that attracts tourists wishing to explore the connections between geology, local communities, culture, and nature. Geoparks are designed to promote tourism and celebrate a region’s uniqueness, and do not prohibit any land use.