Code of Conduct

  • Respect Mother Nature: tread lightly, and learn what plants and animals are threatened or endangered.
  • Respect landowner property rights: ask permission to cross private land, and do not trespass.
  • Blueberry fields are a valuable crop and are on private land; restrict picking to U-Pick operations.
  • Camp only in designated areas.
  • Keep dogs on a leash when visiting beaches where migrating shorebirds are present.
  • Respect Provincial and municipal laws and regulations governing fossil, mineral and artifact collecting. Fossils are protected in Nova Scotia and may be collected only under permit by the Nova Scotia Museum.
  • Notify park and museum staff of any discoveries.
  • Plan ahead and check tide times, leaving at least two hours to return to your starting point before high tide.
  • Protect yourself from:
    • The sun
    • Rough terrain and slippery rocks
    • Falling rocks (by keeping a safe distance from cliffs and avoiding overhanging rocks)
    • Wild animals (by knowing how to act if encountering coyotes or bears)
  • ‘Leave no trace’ of your visit.

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Tomorrow Monday, September 30 is Orange Shirt Day, an annual event to recognize the experience of residential schools.

Individuals and communities across Canada continue to suffer the intergenerational effects of the violence from residential schools. “Orange Shirt Day began in 2013 as a result of residential school survivor Phyllis Jack Webstad discussing her experience when she arrived at a residential school. On her first day at residential school Phyllis had her new orange shirt taken away from her. Phyllis' experience is used today to teach students about residential schools and their assimilation practices.”

The date of September 30 was chosen for the annual event because it is the time of year in which Indigenous children were historically taken from their homes to residential schools. In addition to simply wearing an orange shirt on September 30, this annual event encourages Canadians to learn about the history of residential schools.
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3 weeks ago

Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Global Geopark

More inspiration from Nikos Zouros, President of the Global Geoparks Network and Cliffs of Fundy evaluator ... See MoreSee Less

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This poster says it all: Geoparks are all about connecting people with the Earth (the geological map of Europe as backdrop ...) Making new partnerships for Cliffs of Fundy at the 15th European Geoparks Conference ... See MoreSee Less

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***It's Contest Time***

As the season changes, a new and wonderful landscape is revealed! Share the story of your favourite landscape within the Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Geopark boundary (from Debert to Cape Chignecto and into the Cobequids) using a photograph and a brief description of the image and what it means to you!

Everyone who posts will be entered into a draw to win a Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Geopark hat, pin, and guidebook !

Contest ends October 4th at 9:00 am.
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What is a Geopark?

A Geopark is a designation that attracts tourists wishing to explore the connections between geology, local communities, culture, and nature. Geoparks are designed to promote tourism and celebrate a region’s uniqueness, and do not prohibit any land use.