Fraserville Scenic Drive

The Fundy Cliffs and indeed the landscape of Nova Scotia are shaped by the Cobequid Fault, running east-west from Cape Chignecto to Canso. From Diligent River to Fraserville, the fault intersects the shore and cliffs, weaving and cutting them and throwing rocks of different geologic age and character upon each other. Here the fault also brings the Cobequid highlands to the coast, creating a roller-coaster ride along the scenic drive, where each hill has its own name!

Geological Formation: Various
Age: Carboniferous to Triassic (350-200 million years)
Directions: Between Fraserville and Port Greville, Highway 209 crosses north of the Cobequid Fault into the Cobequid Highlands. The view distracts from the twisting road, so drive with caution.


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If you're curious as to why Cliffs of Fundy boasts the highest tides on the planet, check out this explanation from NASA. The stunning image was captured by NASA's Aqua Earth-Science Satellite Mission.

earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/145784/massive-muddy-tides-in-the-bay-of-fundy?src=ve
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2 months ago

Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Global Geopark

Mark your calendars! The date for the 2020 Not Since Moses Race has been released. This locally-run event attracts people from all over the world to race the world's highest tides against a backdrop of stunning cliffs and shoreline. ... See MoreSee Less

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Tomorrow Monday, September 30 is Orange Shirt Day, an annual event to recognize the experience of residential schools.

Individuals and communities across Canada continue to suffer the intergenerational effects of the violence from residential schools. “Orange Shirt Day began in 2013 as a result of residential school survivor Phyllis Jack Webstad discussing her experience when she arrived at a residential school. On her first day at residential school Phyllis had her new orange shirt taken away from her. Phyllis' experience is used today to teach students about residential schools and their assimilation practices.”

The date of September 30 was chosen for the annual event because it is the time of year in which Indigenous children were historically taken from their homes to residential schools. In addition to simply wearing an orange shirt on September 30, this annual event encourages Canadians to learn about the history of residential schools.
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2 months ago

Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Global Geopark

More inspiration from Nikos Zouros, President of the Global Geoparks Network and Cliffs of Fundy evaluator ... See MoreSee Less

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What is a Geopark?

A Geopark is a designation that attracts tourists wishing to explore the connections between geology, local communities, culture, and nature. Geoparks are designed to promote tourism and celebrate a region’s uniqueness, and do not prohibit any land use.