Lakelands

Our pathways and roads often follow the land that has been shaped by geology: so it is for the path of Highway 2 north of Parrsboro, which follows a cleft in the Cobequid Hills formed by glaciers more than 10,000 years ago. At Lakelands, the landscape looks as if huge loads of gravel were dumped by the side of the Hebert River – and so it was. As the glacial ice melted, it left behind hummocks of gravel called kames, on which blueberries now grow.

Geological Formation: Kame fields
Age: Quaternary (circa 10,000 years ago)
Directions: Head north from Parrsboro on Highway 2 past the intersection with Highway 209 to Lakelands. The rolling, gravelly hills of blueberry fields on both sides of the road are glacial kames.


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What is a Geopark?

A Geopark is a designation that attracts tourists wishing to explore the connections between geology, local communities, culture, and nature. Geoparks are designed to promote tourism and celebrate a region’s uniqueness, and do not prohibit any land use.