Local Food

Cliffs of Fundy is home to many regional foods and traditional harvesting methods with strong and unique links to geology and landscape. Nearly all of these foods were enjoyed by, and their harvesting methods learnt from, the indigenous Mi’kmaq peoples, who shared their knowledge with later settlers. The unique traditional culinary experiences of Cliffs of Fundy are dependent on the
seasons. These regional foods can be purchased in restaurants, giftshops, markets, and directly from local producers throughout the Geopark.

  • Wild blueberries grow on acidic glacial kame fields, the largest wild blueberry harvest worldwide. Wild blueberries are harvested in late August and celebrated at the Nova Scotia Wild Blueberry Festival.
  • Traditional weir fishing uses the natural tidal cycle of the Bay of Fundy and draws on Mi’kmaw teachings. The fishery is a sustainable fishery with virtually no by-catch of endangered species.
  • World-renowned clams thrive in the intertidal muds. Visit the seafood take-outs along the shore for an order of local fried clams.
  • Dulse is an endemic food of dried seaweed that grows naturally in the bay. Picked by hand at low tide, locally-harvested dulse varies in taste based on the location at which it was picked.
  • Maple syrup production involves tapping the native sugar maples that favour the highlands. Maple farms open to visitors in the Spring, when the sap begins to flow.

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Tomorrow Monday, September 30 is Orange Shirt Day, an annual event to recognize the experience of residential schools.

Individuals and communities across Canada continue to suffer the intergenerational effects of the violence from residential schools. “Orange Shirt Day began in 2013 as a result of residential school survivor Phyllis Jack Webstad discussing her experience when she arrived at a residential school. On her first day at residential school Phyllis had her new orange shirt taken away from her. Phyllis' experience is used today to teach students about residential schools and their assimilation practices.”

The date of September 30 was chosen for the annual event because it is the time of year in which Indigenous children were historically taken from their homes to residential schools. In addition to simply wearing an orange shirt on September 30, this annual event encourages Canadians to learn about the history of residential schools.
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3 weeks ago

Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Global Geopark

More inspiration from Nikos Zouros, President of the Global Geoparks Network and Cliffs of Fundy evaluator ... See MoreSee Less

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This poster says it all: Geoparks are all about connecting people with the Earth (the geological map of Europe as backdrop ...) Making new partnerships for Cliffs of Fundy at the 15th European Geoparks Conference ... See MoreSee Less

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***It's Contest Time***

As the season changes, a new and wonderful landscape is revealed! Share the story of your favourite landscape within the Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Geopark boundary (from Debert to Cape Chignecto and into the Cobequids) using a photograph and a brief description of the image and what it means to you!

Everyone who posts will be entered into a draw to win a Cliffs of Fundy Aspiring Geopark hat, pin, and guidebook !

Contest ends October 4th at 9:00 am.
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What is a Geopark?

A Geopark is a designation that attracts tourists wishing to explore the connections between geology, local communities, culture, and nature. Geoparks are designed to promote tourism and celebrate a region’s uniqueness, and do not prohibit any land use.